Schedules are for Unorganized People

Schedules are for Unorganized People

Many years ago, when I was pregnant with child number three, a very put together, organized friend came over and helped me get my home in order. I practically worshiped her. Her home was clean. ALL the time. And beautifully decorated. And she knew where her car keys were, all the time.

Confession: I used to be terribly unorganized. I knew I had organization in me…somewhere. I just didn’t know how to get it out. I didn’t know the simple truth I am sharing with you today….

Schedules are for Unorganized People

Schedules are for unorganized People

I used to think that people who were super organized were born that way. Some are. Some aren’t. I thought I was organized when I just had to take care of ME. Then I went to college, met Mr. Right. Got married. Three kids later and I was drowning in unorganized chaos. You wouldn’t know it to look at me or my house. I seemed to keep the dishes washed most days. And I washed clothes. It was just those days when I couldn’t find this or that or I didn’t know whether I should mop the floor or go through the bedrooms. Not to mention, I felt the need to train my children to take care of their things and learn some responsibility.

I needed a tool to help me. I needed a schedule.

Some gals I know are afraid to use schedules. They are afraid they might mess up. And they will. I do. Some schedules need tweaking. Some schedules get set aside for a day or two. But, they are still great tools.  A farmer doesn’t throw his hoe away if he accidentally hits himself on the toe one day. Or if he doesn’t use it for three days. No, he picks that thing up and uses it again.

A schedule is a tool that I am in charge of. I choose it. I use it. I tweak it. If it works for me, I work it. If it doesn’t, I scrap it.

We gals don’t like people telling us we need to get organized. So, I’m not telling you. Here are some things to consider….. If you cannot find your car keys, your kids don’t have any clean underwear and you eat cereal for dinner several nights a week, those things tell you. I’m not going to tell you what kind of schedule to use. I don’t know what will work for you. I will tell you a schedule won’t work for you if you don’t use one. If you feel unorganized today, you will feel that way tomorrow unless you change your habits. It’s totally up to you.

This article was birthed out of a conversation with my eldest, daughter- Audrey, who commented that several friends had said that schedules didn’t work for them and then promptly threw them out. No, schedules don’t work for you. They are a tool, like the hoe. You pick it up and use it. With your help, your muscles, it tills the soil. It does what is needed by your power linked to the design of the tool.

When you have the proper tool, you can be productive. You can be more in control of what happens on a daily basis instead of feeling out of control. That means you can schedule some time for your passion. That’s what the tool of a schedule does. It frees you. It frees you to do whatever your God-sized dream is. If frees you from fretting about whether you should do the dishes or write for half an hour. Read a book to your child or clean out the garage. You decide. Dust the house and make cookies. Up to you. Instead of having lists and lists of things running through your head of what you should be doing. You know. The guilt list. I should Clorox the sink. I should sweep out the garage. I should write. I should suck up all the cobwebs in the corners. Schedule it. Use the tool. Decide ahead of time. Those cobwebs bothering you today? Tell them- You are scheduled for termination tomorrow. Enjoy your last day hanging around.  Take the powerful tool of scheduling and use it for you. Not for me. For you.

  Let’s together test the power of the schedule tool by trying one out.I know you can do it! Pick up that schedule and use it. Schedule in your God sized dreams. Then share… what has worked for you? What hasn’t worked?

*This is an excerpt from our Mom Habits Course!

Forming Great Habits Doesn’t Mean We Work All the Time

 

Forming great habits doesn’t mean we work all the time.

I come from a family of hard workers. I married a hard worker. Problem is, with those sorts of great examples surrounding me:

  • I can sometimes feel as if I’ll never be enough.
  • My house won’t ever be clean enough.
  • I haven’t decorated my house enough.
  • I haven’t worked out enough.

It’s the Never Enough syndrome. Can you relate? Often we shun reading self-help materials because we feel like a failure as soon as we read the title. Things like:

 

  • Get Organized in Thirty Days
  • Be the Best You in Three Months
  • You’re a Loser, but We can Make You a Winner

 

I totally made those titles up. You get the point, right?

You don_t have to work all the time.

 

38 Now while they were on their way, Jesus entered a village [called Bethany], and a woman named Martha welcomed Him into her home. 39 She had a sister named Mary, who seated herself at the Lord’s feet and was continually listening to His teaching. 40 But Martha was very busy and distracted with all of her serving responsibilities; and she approached Him and said, “Lord, is it of no concern to You that my sister has left me to do the serving alone? Tell her to help me and do her part.” 41 But the Lord replied to her, “Martha, Martha, you are worried and bothered and anxious about so many things; 42 but only one thing is necessary, for Mary has chosen the good part [that which is to her advantage], which will not be taken away from her.”- Luke 10: 38-42

 

Can you imagine, ladies. Jesus comes to your home in the flesh? I will confess there are many times when I have been the Martha, cleaning up and being distracted with serving instead of focusing on the guest or my family. Mary chose the good part. She chose to focus on Jesus. We can learn a few things from Mary. Take the time to listen to Jesus. Take the time to focus on your family instead of getting caught up in the service. You don’t have to work all the time.

*This is an excerpt from our Mom Habits Course.

 

 

Moms, You are the Boss and the Employee

Kathleen and Amerey discuss home administration and how usually when you’re a mom, you end up being at the top and the bottom of the totem pole.

Moms, You are the Boss and the Employee (1)

 

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Seriously, we do it all! We’re jacks of all trades! But sometimes it is too much! We encourage you to set realistic goals and expectations and give a glimpse into a healthy way to be the boss and the employee of your home! Be sure to subscribe to stay up-to-date on our podcasts! Please follow our Facebook page, The Whole House, and on Instagram @the_whole_house Thank you so much for joining us!

 

 

Mothering When There Are Obstacles

Do you feel as if you can’t get around or over the obstacles in motherhood?

Episode 6

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Do you  feel as if your God-sized dream of Motherhood is similar to running a gauntlet? You’re not alone. There are obstacles in pursuing any God-sized dream. Obstacles don’t mean you are on the wrong path, it often means you are on the right path. The devil doesn’t mind if you start something, as long as you don’t finish it. Often, our attitudes are the obstacles. OUCH. Yep. A huge door of opportunity is open for us and with it mushrooming opposition (I Cor. 16: 9). We don’t have it all together. The Whole House CANNOT give you a five step program of how to clear the opposition. What we at The Whole House can do is say “me too”. We are down in trenches together. Join us on The Whole House Podcast and be encouraged and listen to Kathleen tell about five plates of spaghetti hitting the floor in one dinner.

 

 

Expect a Mom Meltdown This Christmas Season

Expect a Mom meltdown.

Last year during the Christmas season, my good friend Lori posted this on Instagram:

“I am in panic mode you guys. I worry about what I’ve gotten the kids, if they’ll like what they are going to get, who else I need to buy for, where are all the extra funds going to come from? I know this isn’t the reason we celebrate, but I can’t help it. I want to give my kids the world! They don’t ask for things. In fact, JR only asked for one thing and he said he didn’t care if he got nothing else. The stress of money and things have made me grumpy and to not enjoy this season like I used to. I feel so behind….not just with Christmas, but on the house, with school. My mind is rarely on the joy that Christmas brings. So, I’m going to try and combat that this week. We are going to bake cookies, maybe research how other countries celebrate Christmas, and read the story of Jesus’ birth….I need to be reminded why Christmas makes me so happy, and I need to release myself from the stress and let God take the lead (because I’m such a control freak).”

And… the feedback was in agreement. I shared “you are not alone” and other Moms agreed that they have meltdown before Christmas moments. Some blame it on peer pressure. Yep, it is there. But I think most of it stems from our wanting to make Christmas perfect for our families. A top notch goal? Right?

Expect
A
Mom Meltdown

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Blogs and articles this season have a wide array of advice about advent readings, the true meaning of Christmas, how to decorate the best tree, the best deals on gifts, yummy cookie recipes.

* * *

And these are all good things unless we Moms let them be the ruler by which we measure ourselves with. Then things get dicey. Our inner monologue becomes one of should haves and should dos instead of peaceful thankful thoughts.

* * *

I am not immune to the inner monologue or the meltdowns. I had one the other day. My inner voice says, you won’t have enough to get everything for everyone and you won’t have enough energy to do everything you need to do.

* * *

Biblical Application:

How do we combat these meltdowns and the negative speak? With the truth.

My God shall supply all my needs according to His riches and glory. (Philippians 4:19)

Needs. Not wants. Needs. Not perfection. The truth is God will supply what it is in His will to supply. He is not  our perfection provider.

I traveled to my eldest daughter, Audrey’s for a cookie baking day. I picked up my second eldest daughter, Amerey, and baby Cecilia on the way. I was feeling pretty great about the trip. I had given all my baking supplies to Audrey the day before. I didn’t need to bring anything but myself and the dough. Here’s what happened:

The fog was so dense in the mountain passes that I missed my exit. I had to travel further down the road and turn around and try not to miss it again. I almost missed the turn into Audrey’s neighborhood because I was disoriented. We pulled in her driveway and jumped out of the car, “I forgot my cookie dough!”

“What?! Mom?!”

Audrey ran out, “What’s wrong?”

“I forgot my cookie dough!”

“Mom, I didn’t make any because you and Amerey were bringing some!”

We laughed. It worked out. Audrey ran to the store and bought some more supplies. We did make cookies. We did have a good  time.

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A joyous Christmas season is not based on perfection. We’re just a bunch of human beings.

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“Now the birth of Jesus Christ took place under these circumstances: “

-Matthew 1:18

The perfect gift of Christ was delivered in much less than perfect circumstances- an unexpected pregnancy, an edict to travel, birth in a manger. Yet, the gift was still was and is perfect.

Expect a Mom meltdown. Let it go and move on. I pray that God shows you His presence in your imperfect circumstances. Speak truth to your inner self. Christmas joy does not demand perfection.

*This is an excerpt from 25 Days of Thriving Through Christmas (1)